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Ano Ba Zine


Voices from the Pilipinx diaspora

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Ano Ba Zine


Voices from the Pilipinx diaspora

Issue 3 : december 2017

 
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Editor's Thoughts


Issue #3

Editor's Thoughts


Issue #3

It has been such a joy to see the enthusiastic response from femme, trans, “Baylan” and gender non-conforming contributors. 

This issue was borne from hunger. A hunger to see ourselves and each other, a hunger to be seen separate from the cis-heteronormative, white, male gaze. There is a Tagalog concept of pilipinx personhood called kapwa, which means the self in the other. This issue embodies just that. This is a space where we can see ourselves reflected in each other, in our stories.

In a time when narcissistic white men run our government and make decisions about our lives and our bodies, we feel we need stories of community, resilience, and resistance to nourish our souls and soothe our collective heartbreak. In the wake of #metoo, we thought about how public discourse and visibility can be healing, and/or traumatizing, empowering and/or isolating. We asked, which stories are buried, and which ones are amplified, raised up, and manipulated by those in power? How do we magnify our voices—the voices of the systemically silenced?

 

 

In this issue we see femininity and non-binary gender expression defined as strength, as our spiritual connection to the earth, as the ancient link to our ancestors and transcestors. We see how our people survived and thrived in spite of white supremacy and the cis-hetero patriarchy. We see our narratives reclaimed and rewritten. By us, for us.

Pre-colonial pilipinx femmes and non-binary folks were babaylan—our healers, our guides, our conduits to the spirit world. Spanish colonialism and U.S. imperialism tried to erase us. But our bodies re-member. We are constantly re-membering our individual and collective bodies.

With this issue we re-member and tell stories that shaped our identity. Our contributors unlock shared truths, reveal themselves through prose, and embrace pasts that have influenced and molded our art. We invite you to sit with our stories, to use them as a platform to share your own, to add your voice to the rising tide crawling up our collective throats and building up to a scream. Or is it a song?

- Ligaiya Romero & Diana Diroy

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Co-Founders


Co-Founders


Ligaiya Romero

is a documentary filmmaker and visual artist interested in collective memory and the decolonial imagination. She is currently a visiting professor at UNC-Chapel Hill teaching documentary film and photography. Her most recent project explores the relationships between QTPOC, mental wellness, decolonial resistance, and magic.

BRIAN BRAGANZA

A visual artist and writer from the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles County, Brian currently resides in Brooklyn, NY, and enjoys dog memes and riding his bicycle with The Book Keepers Bicycle Club. He also plays bass in the pinoy hardcore punk band Namatay Sa Ingay, and likes to make videos.

PHILIP DE GUZMAN

By way of West Covina, CA, Philip now resides in Brooklyn, NY. He is a MFA candidate at Columbia University, and when he's not writing, he enjoys cooking Pilipinx food from a handwritten recipe book given to him by his mother.